January

Christianity.

Judaism

Secular

Punjabi

Telugu, Karnataka, Gujarat and Maharashtra

Tamil

February

Christianity

  • Candlemas: February Feast of the Presentation of the Lord; 40 days after Christmas; end of Christmas/Epiphany Season

Historical

  • Lupercalia: 15 February  the Roman end-of-winter festival

Paganism

  • Imbolc:1 February first day of spring in the Celtic calendar

Secular

March

Paganism

Christianity

  • Saint David’s Day:1 March the fixed date to honour Saint David, patron saint of Wales, celebrated by Welshmen and women everywhere throughout the world
  • Saint Patrick’s Day:17 March the fixed date to honor Saint Patrick has sometimes been moved by Church if it coincides withHoly Week, but the secular world usually always celebrates it on 17 March

Judaism

Secular

Secular and multiple religions

Hinduism

  • Holi(Hindu holiday in honour ofLord Vishnu)
  • Dhulendi:6 March
  • Ram Navami:28th March– Birthday of Lord Rama is celebrated all over India. The epic Ramayana is recited in temples and homes.

April

Judaism

  • Passover:late March or in AprilSee “movable”

Secular

Christianity

  • Easter:typically in April, but sometimes in March or May, see “movable”
  • Good Friday:the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, see “movable”

Hinduism

South and Southeast Asian

  • Traditional New Year:14 April(Usually between 12th-14th April. Date is reckoned based on sun’s entry into theconstellation Aries)  In many South and Southeast Asian cultures the festival is based on harvesting of crops and a new beginning marked by the sun’s entry into theconstellation Aries.

May

Judaism

Paganism

  • May Day: May a traditional spring holiday in many cultures.

Secular

June

Judaism

Hinduism

Islam

  • EID UL FITR(5 June 2019)

Secular

July

Hinduism

August

Christianity

Judaism

Hinduism

Islam

Secular

September

Judaism

  • Rosh Hashanah: usually September, sometimes early October
  • Yom Kippur: late September, early October
  • Sukkot: sometimes late September, usually October

Secular

October

Christianity

  • All Hallows’ Eve(Halloween):31 October a Christian-titled holiday that is often celebrated with traditions originating from a mixture of secular and Celtic pagan influences.
  • Dia de los muertos(Day of the Dead): 31 October 2 November  Celebrated in mostly catholic Mexico but with origins that predate European contact.

Judaism

Hinduism

Paganism

  • Samhain: 31 October 1 November first day of winter in the Celtic calendar (and Celtic New Year’s Day)

Secular

November

Christianity

Secular

Hinduism

  • Diwali:mid-Octobermid-November see “movable”

December

Buddhism

  • Bodhi Day:8 December Day of Enlightenment, celebrating the day that the historicalBuddha(Shakyamuni or Siddhartha Gautama) experienced enlightenment (also known as Bodhi).

Christianity

Hinduism

  • Pancha Ganapati: a modern five-day Hindu festival celebrated from 21 through 25 December in honor of Ganesha.

Historical

  • Malkh:25 December
  • Mdraniht: or Mothers’ Night, the Saxon winter solstice festival.
  • Saturnalia:1723 December An ancient Roman winter solstice festival in honor of thedeity Saturn, held on 17 December of theJulian calendarand expanded with festivities through to 23 December. Celebrated with sacrifice, a public banquet, followed by private gift-giving, continual partying, and a carnival.
  • Dies Natalis Solis Invicti(Day of the birth of the Unconquered Sun):25 December late Roman Empire

Humanism

  • HumanLight:23 December Humanist holiday originated by the New Jersey Humanist Network in celebration of “a Humanist’s vision of a good future.”[7]

Judaism

  • Hanukkah: usually falls anywhere between late November and early January. See “movable”

Paganism

  • Yule:Paganwinter festival that was celebrated by the historicalGermanic peoplefrom late December to early January.
  • Yalda:21 December The turning point, Winter Solstice. As the longest night of the year and the beginning of the lengthening of days,Shabe YaldorShabe Chelleis an Iranian festival celebrating the victory of light and goodness over darkness and evil.Shabe yaldameans ‘birthday eve.’ According to Persian mythology,Mithrawas born at dawn on 22 December to avirgin mother. He symbolizes light, truth, goodness, strength, and friendship.Herodotusreports that this was the most important holiday of the year for contemporary Persians. In modern times Persians celebrateYaldaby staying up late or all night, a practice known asShab Cherameaning ‘night gazing’. Fruits and nuts are eaten, especially pomegranates and watermelons, whose red color invokes the crimson hues of dawn and symbolize Mithra.
  • Koliada:Slavicwinter festival celebrated on late December with parades and singers who visit houses and receive gifts.

Secular

Salgirah: 13 December – celebration of Shia Ismaili Muslims of their Imam (Aga Khan IV)